Sunday, 14th September 2008

             

          

 

Walk: Coniston Fells - Brim Fell, Grey Friar, Great Carrs, Swirl How, Wetherlam, Coppermines Valley
Start Point: Walna Scar Road Grid Reference: SD 288 970
Distance: 10.6 miles Ascent: 3,470 feet
Time: 7 hours    
Weather: A dry but mainly misty day
Comments: As we approached Coniston the sky was clear but by the time we reached the car park mist was descending over the fell tops. Walking up through the disused mine workings we ascended into the mist and when we reached Low Water it had become quite thick. As we climbed Brim Fell Haws with not a sound or movement of air, and surrounded by thick mist, it did feel decidedly eerie! However, we forged our way on and eventually reached Brim Fell's distinct cairn.
I knew that finding the path across to Grey Friar wouldn't be easy in such a thick mist but after a false start, which gave us a view of the Seathwaite Valley, we eventually found the correct path and were rewarded with a view of Grey Friar as the mist cleared for a short time. Heading back to Great Carrs the mist closed in again and there were no more views until we descended Prison Band, where we stopped for lunch. After reaching Wetherlam we turned right and took the left fork to lead down towards the Furness Fells, then on to Hole Rake and the Coppermines Valley. Crossing the Miners Bridge it was then a mile of walking on tracks and road to take us back to the cars.
The group was very disappointed that they missed out on the views so, as I had done this walk previously with friends (minus Grey Friar) I promised them that I would add those for a short time.

Scroll down to see photos of the walk

Climbing up to the disused mine workings . . .

 

from where we can see that the mist is closing in

 

I don't think we'll explore this tunnel!

 

Monster eyes?!

 

No, just two rocks in a very misty Low Water

 

At least the cairn on Brim Fell is big enough to find - even in mist

 

The Seathwaite Valley comes into view as we traverse across to Grey Friar

 

A brief break in the mist reveals Grey Friar, our next port of call . . .

 

where the leader checks out the cairn . . .

 

then spots the Matterhorn rock as we leave the summit

 

 

 

The group checks out the memorial . . .

 

to the crew killed in the Halifax bomber that crashed here

 

Karen and Lesley take a closer look at the cairn on Wetherlam . . .

 

and are joined by the rest of the group

 

On the descent from Wetherlam, and still misty over Coniston Water

 

Almost back down to the valley . . .

 

where we cross Red Dell Beck

 

on our way to the Miners Bridge

 

Coniston Water comes into view - very calm

 

I saw these dead trees 12 months ago!

 

As I promised the group, below are photos from the same walk 12 months ago - on a much better day

 

The Bell in the foreground with Wetherlam behind

 

The path up through the mine workings

 

Signs of a time gone by

 

Low Water - our path can just be seen to the right of the gully (not marked on the map)

 

Looking back down to Low Water with the 'tourist' route to Coniston Old Man zig-zagging up the fell

 

Brim Fell

 

Coniston Old Man

 

Dow Crag looks impressive from Brim Fell

 

A 'very blue' Levers Water

 

The sun catches the fields near Coniston Water

 

Dropping down from Swirl How, Prison Band looks very steep from Great Carrs

 

The memorial to the crew of the Halifax bomber that crashed here . . .

 

with its new plaque

 

Looking across Great Carrs from Swirl How, Bow Fell can be seen on the skyline with Red Tarn and Pike O'Blisco on the right

 

From Prison Band the oath to Wetherlam doesn't look too bad - once we have got down to the hause!

 

Heading down Prison Band Coniston Water comes into view again

 

Crinkle Crags in shadow and Bow Fell catching a spot of sun

 

An nameless tarn on the way to Red Gill Head Moss

 

The best of the weather saved itself for the end of the day . . .

 

but these trees have come to the end of their days!

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