Sunday, 4th October

             

            

 

Walk: Mosergh Farm, Whiteside Pike, Todd Fell, Capplebarrow, Ancrow Brow, Bannisdale Head, Long Crag, White Howe, Lamb Pasture, Bannisdale High Bridge
Start Point: Grass verge near Mosergh Farm junction Grid Reference: SD 530 999
Distance: 11 miles Ascent: 2,230 feet
Time: 6 hrs    
Weather: Mainly sunny with a cold wind in exposed areas
Comments: Today we were joined by four members of SuMMitt Good, a Ramblers Association group aimed at the 20s and 30s age group in Cumbria. In all, 14 of us set out on what Wainwright, in his Outlying Fells book, describes as 'only for the superbly fit' and 'a gruelling test for old age pensioners'!
Heading along the bridleway to Whiteside Pike we soon came across the first obstacle of the day, a padlocked gate - leading onto Open Access land. Having navigated our way up to the Pike we continued down through the heather to the wall, where access to Todd Fell is over what could almost be classed as a wall stile (using the protruding stones as suggested by Wainwright). The exit from Todd Fell now requires a few extra climbing skills! From here we followed the fence line until it turned directly north after Ancrow Brow, detouring around the unnamed tarn on the way. Leaving the fence at the corner we headed in a south-easterly direction towards Long Crag. After navigating over peat bogs and a large marshy area we eventually reached the only ladder style on this walk. In his book Wainwright marks the Outlying Fell north of the stile whilst other information puts it to the south-west on the other side of the wall. Taking the latter, with its rocky outcrop, as the most advantageous point, we stopped to enjoy the views as we ate lunch. Another climb took us to  White Howe ,with its distinctive white trig point, and its twin summit, just one foot lower and sporting a small cairn. The path from here led us down to the area described by Wainwright as being endowed with 'a pattern of ineffective irrigation ditches'. I think I found one of these ditches, sinking in to my knee, and it was full of water (thank goodness for gaiters). The last climb of the day brought us to Lamb Pasture where you had to look carefully to spot the rocks hidden amongst the long crass - can 2 or 3 rocks be classed as a cairn?! Leaving the summit we then picked up a grassy path that joined a farm track on the way to Thorn Cottage. After walking down the road and across the bridge we headed across fields and back to the cars - walking on what was originally part of the old Shap Road.

Scroll down to see photos of the walk

Heading along the bridleway towards Whiteside Pike . . .

 

a rocky outcrop . . .

 

with a substantial cairn . . .

 

where we stop for a group photo . . .

 

and check out the view up the Longsleddale valley

 

The main group heads for Todd Fell . . .

 

where the 'cairn' is nearly lost in the grass . . .

 

and the exit from the fell requires a little navigation

 

A rocky rise provides the perfect spot for our morning coffee . . .

 

before continuing through a gate . . .

 

and following the fence that leads most of the way to Bannisdale Head

 

The unnamed tarn requires a detour to cross at its outlet stream

 

Looking across Kentmere Pike to Ill Bell just before leaving the fence . . .

 

to head across Bannisdale Head towards Long Crag

 

A peaty, boggy section requires a hop,

 

skip and

 

a jump to reach 'drier' land

 

Having navigated a particularly boggy section we reach the stile . . .

 

that leads across to Long Crag (though in Wainwright's book it is marked near the stile)

 

Looking towards Borrowdale Moss on our way to . . .

 

White Howe . . .

 

with its distinctive trig point

 

Then its across the unnamed summit to Lamb Pasture on the right . . .

 

but first we make our way across the ridge through tussocky grass

 

Lamb Pasture has a couple of rocks, hidden by Phil (with the poles), to mark the summit . . .

 

from where we can see the coast and a rain shower to the left. . .

 

back up the Bannisdale Valley with Capplebarrow crags to the right . . .

 

and down to Lowbridge House hidden amongst the trees

 

Heading down to Thorn Cottage . . .

 

we cross the River Mint at Bannisdale High Bridge . . .

 

and as we head along the original Shap road (according to Wainwright) the Howgills are highlighted by the sun

 

Then a short walk along the road takes us back to the cars

Return to 2009 Diary                                                                     Return to top