Sunday, 13th June 2010

   

            

 

Walk: Park Brow, Spying How, Glencoyne Head, Sticks Pass, Stybarrow Dodd, Watson's Dodd, Great Dodd, Matterdale Common, Dowthwaitehead, Dockray, Aira Force
Start Point: A5091, Park Brow Grid Reference: NY 397 205
Distance: 13 miles Ascent: 3,000 feet
Time: 6 hours    
Weather: Overcast, some rain and low mist with a cold breeze on the tops
Comments: Walking above Glencoyne Park and the on the slopes of Glencoyne Valley, we made our way to the upper reaches of the Greenside mines. Continuing up Sticks Pass we reached the cross road between Raise and Stybarrow Dodd. Having remained dry so far, we donned extra layers to keep out the mist and wind. On attaining Stybarrow Dodd, with the mist now turning to rain, we wasted no time in continuing to Watson's Dodd and Great Dodd. After a quick lunch on Great Dodd we descended from the tops via Matterdale Common. Upon reaching the Old Coach Road in dry weather, we headed off to Dowthwaitehead. The last spell of rain was encountered on this stretch. The last leg of the walk took us from Dowthwaitehead along a path, roughly following Aira Beck, for the road to Dockray and Aira Force. The weather forecast for the day was heavy rain, in fact we only had mist and rain on the tops and one short period of rain mid afternoon. A reasonable to good day was therefore achieved by the six that attended the walk.

Scroll down to see photos of the walk

The bracken has really shot up in the last couple of weeks

 

Good views down Ullswater with Place Fell on the left . . .

 

but as we climb the mist starts to descend

 

Looking down the Glencoyne Valley we can see the upper reaches of Ullswater

 

It is still dry as we head up by Stick's Gill . . .

 

but by the time we reach the Pass we have to get the waterproofs out!

 

We are really surrounded by mist by the time we reach Stybarrow Dodd . . .

 

and it accompanies us to Watson's Dodd, where the camera is put away until we reach . . .

 

Lucy's Wood near Dowthwaitehead

 

Thank you to Steve from Preston Bird Watching and Natural Historical Society who has identified the tree as a Maritime Pine (Pinus pinaster), an introduced species from the Mediterranean, the resin of which is used in the production of turpentine and as a flavouring in wines

 

Enjoying better weather at Aira Force . . .

 

we check out the waterfalls . . .

 

but not many people around today . . .

 

as the water rushes down the chasm

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