Sunday, 23rd October 2011

   

            

 

Walk: Towneley Hall, Hameldon Hill, Great Hameldon Hill, Love Clough, Crown Point, Dyneley Farm, Towneley Hall.
Start Point: Towneley Hall car park Grid Reference: SD 850 308
Distance: 14.5 miles Ascent: 2,100 feet
Time: 7 hours    
Weather: Dry with sunny spells and clear sky
Comments: Four set off from the car park all quite surprised at how good the weather conditions were, as we had driven through low lying thick cloud and rain on our journey to the starting point. As a result we were all in high spirits as we followed the Burnley Way across the Burnley golf course, past Clowbridge Reservoir and on up to Hameldon Hill. It was here where we stopped for our 11ís with great views across to Pendle Hill. Dropping down off Hameldon Hill we left the Burnley Way to cut across open access land to a small cairn marking a point with clear views back beneath Hameldon Hill and out across Burnley, Padiham and Accrington. Strange as it may sound the views out over these urban areas of East Lancashire was quite spectacular. We then headed up to Great Hameldon. This area was clearly quite remote with no clear footpaths to follow across this very rough terrain just our natural instinct to follow our noses on upwards until we reached the summit trig point. From here we dropped down to and through Love Clough where we joined the Rossendale Way taking us over Gambleside moor to Compsonís cross. Compsonís cross did mark the position of an old wayside cross, Western Cross, erected in the 13th Century which was positioned at the crossroads of two ancient tracks, one from Whalley Abbey to the Abbeyís estates at Brandwood, Bacup and the other from Preston to Heptonstall which was once the centre of the West Yorkshire woollen trade. Today Compsonís Cross sits 250 yds from its original position having being moved here in 1902. From the cross we left the Rossendale way to follow a path on to the Singing Ringing Tree at Crown Point. We then dropped down to end the walk with a stroll through the grounds of Towneley Hall.

Scroll down to see photos of the walk

Starting out through woodland

 

Passing a contented shire horse

 

The sun begins to appear . . .

 

as we pass Burnley golf course

 

Looking down on Clowbridge reservoir from the Burnley Way

 

Heading for our first summit (the mast in the distance)

 

The notice tells of the work past and future to be done on the Burnley Way (The Wholaw Nook Project)

 

One of the four sculptures representing the seasons (this is Autumn with ripe seeds ready to fall to the ground)

 

A spectator watches us pass

 

Despite several attempts we Never quite worked out who this 'Des Res' was for

 

No it's not the golf club again! It's the weather radar on Hameldon Hill . . .

 

where the trig point provides a useful seat for elevenses

 

Ian leads the way to the next summit

 

But first we detour to . . .

 

a view point

 

A seat in the middle of nowhere? Must have been someone's favourite spot

 

Great Hameldon Hill summit

 

One of the disused mines in the area which we managed to avoid . . .

 

before finding this convenient bench for our lunch stop . . .

 

before heading down to 'Love Clough'

 

Climbing out of the valley once more Hameldon Hill is soon left behind us . . .

 

as we press on to Meadow Head . . .

 

passing this ancient cross on the way

 

Very colourful moorland grass

 

Heading towards . . .

 

'The Singing Tree' . . .

 

which is actually a sculpture comprising of . . .

 

lots of tubes arranged like a tree which 'sing' as the wind passes over the tubes

 

After listening to 'the tree' it's on down to Cliviger . . .

 

to join the path back to Towneley Hall . . .

 

where the real trees are starting to display their Autumn colours . . .

 

and sculptures can be found on the woodland trail

 

The back of Towneley Hall . . .

 

with its garden sculptures . . .

 

then it's round to the front of the hall . . .

 

to return to the car park via the main avenue

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